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“Dark Joy”

Dr. Julie Newberry, Wheaton College

Dr. Julie Newberry, Assistant Professor of New Testament at Wheaton College, joins Dr. Capes on “Exegetically Speaking” to consider the ramifications of the kind of “dark joy” found among the Jerusalem leaders who conspired with Judas to betray Jesus (Luke 22:5).  Joy itself is morally ambivalent in Luke’s Gospel. Scoundrels can have joy over some dark act or evil agency.

To listen to the podcast (about 7 minutes) click here.

“Exegetically Speaking” is a weekly podcast of the friends and faculty of Wheaton College, IL and The Lanier Theological Library. Hosted by Dr. David Capes, it features language experts who discuss the importance of learning the biblical languages—Hebrew, Aramaic, and Greek—and show how reading the Bible in the original languages “pays off.” Each podcast lasts between seven and eleven minutes and covers a different topic for those who want to read the Bible for all it is worth.

If you’re interested in going deeper, learn more about Wheaton’s undergraduate degree in Classical Languages (Greek, Hebrew, and Latin) and our MA in Biblical Exegesis

You can hear Exegetically Speaking on SpotifyStitcherApple Podcasts, and YouTube. If you have questions or comments, please contact us at exegetically.speaking@wheaton.edu.

Hail, O Favored One?

Dr. Julie Newberry, Wheaton College

Dr. Julie Newberry, Assistant Professor of New Testament at Wheaton College, investigates the language of Joy and rejoicing in the Gospel of Luke.  She recently finished her PhD at Duke University and defended her dissertation. Congratulations, Julie. She stops by Exegetically Speaking to suggest the angel’s greeting (Luke 1:28) to Mary might not be just a greeting after all.  She considers the contrast between Zechariah’s encounter and Mary’s.

https://exegeticallyspeaking.libsyn.com/hail-o-blessed-one-luke-128-with-dr-julie-newberry

To listen to the 7 minute podcast, click here.

“Exegetically Speaking” is a weekly podcast of the friends and faculty of Wheaton College, IL and The Lanier Theological Library. Hosted by Dr. David Capes, it features language experts who discuss the importance of learning the biblical languages—Hebrew, Aramaic, and Greek—and show how reading the Bible in the original languages “pays off.” Each podcast lasts between seven and eleven minutes and covers a different topic for those who want to read the Bible for all it is worth.

If you’re interested in going deeper, learn more about Wheaton’s undergraduate degree in Classical Languages (Greek, Hebrew, and Latin) and our MA in Biblical Exegesis

You can hear Exegetically Speaking on SpotifyStitcherApple Podcasts, and YouTube. If you have questions or comments, please contact us at exegetically.speaking@wheaton.edu. And keep listening. 

Why Literal Translations Aren’t Always the Best

In this edition of “Exegetically Speaking” . . .

Dr. Douglas Moo, Kenneth T. Wessner Professor of New Testament at Wheaton College, challenges the assumption that literal, word-for-word translations are always the best. Drawing upon his experience on the NIV translation committee, he illustrates his concern in Luke 22:31-32, showing the value of translating for sense rather than word-for-word.wheaton-magazine_august-2017-103036-200x225

You can copy and paste the following URL in your browser:

https://exegeticallyspeaking.libsyn.com/why-literal-translations-arent-the-best

or click here.

The podcast lasts approximately 7 minutes.

Why is Jesus’s Genealogy Different in Matthew and Luke?

I had the privilege in 2014 of giving the Hayward Lectures at Acadia Divinity School in Nova Scotia.  While there I met a young scholar who is working on various topics in the Gospels.  His name is Danny Zacharias.  He had recently finished a project on the question of why Matthew (ch. 1) and Luke (ch 3) have different names in their genealogies of Jesus. Some point to this as a contradiction  which cannot be solved, thus undermining the reliability of the Gospel accounts.  Others see the differences as a matter of purpose and focus. Matthew starts with Abraham and moves forward to Jesus to show that Jesus is the true son of Abraham, the embodiment of Israel.  Luke starts with Jesus and moves back through Abraham to Adam, demonstrating that Jesus is the Savior of all sons of Adam and daughters of Eve.   One traditional “answer” has been that Matthew has Joseph’s genealogy while Luke records Mary’s. Not all, of course, think this is the case.

Dr. Zacharias offers an intriguing approach to the question.  Here is a link to a brief video he did a few years back:

http://www.dannyzacharias.net/blog/2014/10/1/why-is-jesus-genealogy-different-in-matthew-and-luke 

I think you may find it helpful.  If so, please let him know.

 

 

 

Figural Reading . . . the Old in the New

Last year I had the great honor of being on a panel discussion at the Lanier Theological Library with some leading scholars.  The topic was “Figural Reading . . . the Old in the New.” Richard Hays had written an important book on the topic entitled, Reading Backwards: Figural Christology and the Fourfold Gospel Witness (Baylor University Press, 2014). That was the topic of our discussion.  It is an outstanding conversation hosted by Mark Lanier.

Richard Hays (Dean, Duke Divinity School)
Lynn Cohick (Professor, Wheaton College)
Carey Newman (Director, Baylor University Press)
David Capes (Professor, Houston Baptist University)
Mark Lanier (Moderator)

Here is a link to the site:

http://www.laniertheologicallibrary.org/seminar-videos-2/

The discussion takes place over 1 hr and 43 minutes.  If you’re interested in how NT writers read, interpreted and used their Bible–what we call the Old Testament but specifically the Greek version of the Old Testament–this will be a good video to watch.

I’m humbled and gratified to be a part of these conversations.

 

 

 

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