A Word in Edgewise

Deliver Us from Evil?

The final petition of the Lord’s Prayer, the one many memorized, ended “deliver us from evil” (Matthew 6). It is as if evil is this abstract thing from which we need protection. But modern translations have opted for a different reading. In this episode of Exegetically Speaking, I talk with Dr. Robert Plummer, the Collin and Evelyn Aikman Professor of Biblical Studies at The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary and the host of the Daily Dose of Greek screencast (dailydoseofgreek.com), who considers whether the Lord teaches us to pray for deliverance from evil in general, as many translations have it, or from “the evil one,” the devil. Grammar and context, he argues, favor taking it as a reference to the devil.

To listen simply cut and paste the following URL into your browser:

http://exegeticallyspeaking.libsyn.com/deliver-us-from-the-evil-one-matt-613

or click here.

Better yet subscribe to the podcast on YouTube, Spotify, Stitcher or your favorite podcast plato

The Literary Style of Hosea

Recently I sat down with a friend, Danny Carroll, to discuss the ways in which Hosea attempted to persuade the people of Israel and Judah that they needed to change their ways. Here’s a more formal description:

Dr. Danny Carroll Rodas, Scripture Press Ministries Professor of Biblical Studies and Pedagogy at Wheaton College, moves us beyond Hosea 1-3 to consider the various metaphors used by the prophet to communicate the nature of God and the serious afflictions of God’s people.

Dr. Danny Carroll

You can cut and paste this URL:

http://exegeticallyspeaking.libsyn.com/literary-style-of-hosea

or click here.

Tom Holland

Tom Holland is a wonderful historian and writer who you need to know. He cut his teeth on Greek and Roman culture, which of course intersects with the origins of Christianity.

Here is a link to a good article and series of podcast videos that give a bit more information about him. One of those videos features N. T. Wright.

Avoiding Transliteration in Doing Translation

Dr. David Capes, former Dean of Biblical and Theological Studies at Wheaton College, reflects upon moments when William Tyndale invented new words in English to capture the meaning of a Hebrew word. Transliteration only replicates the sounds of the original language, while a translation aims to capture its meaning.

Dr. Capes Lectures at St. Mary’s Seminary, Houston, TX

“Exegetically Speaking” is a weekly podcast of the friends and faculty of Wheaton College, IL and The Lanier Theological Library. Hosted by Dr. David Capes, it features language experts who discuss the importance of learning the biblical languages—Hebrew, Aramaic, and Greek—and show how reading the Bible in the original languages “pays off.” Each podcast lasts between seven and eleven minutes and covers a different topic for those who want to read the Bible for all it is worth.

You can hear Exegetically Speaking on Spotify, Stitcher, iTunes, and YouTube. If you have questions or comments, please contact us at exegetically.speaking@wheaton.edu. And keep listening. 

Syntax Matters: Titus 2:13

Dr. Jon Laansma, Gerald F. Hawthorne Professor of New Testament Greek and Exegesis at Wheaton College, joins me on “Exegetically Speaking” to show the ways Titus 2:13 illustrates how the knowledge of Greek grammar doesn’t usually lead to one “correct” interpretive conclusion, but to a range of viable interpretations. The gains are knowing the boundaries of what is viable and the ability to converse authoritatively with other qualified interpreters.

“Exegetically Speaking” is a weekly podcast of the friends and faculty of Wheaton College, IL and The Lanier Theological Library. Hosted by Dr. David Capes, it features language experts who discuss the importance of learning the biblical languages—Hebrew, Aramaic, and Greek—and show how reading the Bible in the original languages “pays off.” Each podcast lasts between seven and eleven minutes and covers a different topic for those who want to read the Bible for all it is worth.

You can hear Exegetically Speaking on Spotify, Stitcher, iTunes, and YouTube. If you have questions or comments, please contact us at exegetically.speaking@wheaton.edu. And keep listening. 

For the episode above cut and paste the following URL to your browser:

http://exegeticallyspeaking.libsyn.com/syntax-matters-titus-213

Or click here.

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