A Word in Edgewise

Oppressive Presence

In this edition of Exegetically Speaking (a podcast of Wheaton College) . . .

Dr. Aubrey Buster, Assistant Professor of Old Testament at Wheaton College, explores Psalm 139:5, “You have hemmed me in before and behind.” Although we tend to understand this positively, she probes the Hebrew and suggests that this may instead call to mind God’s oppressive presence.

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Dr. Aubrey Buster

You can copy and paste the following URL to your favorite browser:

https://exegeticallyspeaking.libsyn.com/oppressive-presence

or click here.

The podcast last approximately 7 minutes.

Confronting the False Image

In this episode of “Exegetically Speaking” . . .

Dr. Ron Haydon, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Old Testament at Wheaton College, looks Daniel 3, where Nebuchadnezzar demands the worship of a golden idol. Dr. Haydon draws some insights from Aramaic to unpack several important theological nuances in Daniel 3.

You can copy and paste the following URL to your browser:

https://exegeticallyspeaking.libsyn.com/confronting-the-false-image

or click here.

The podcast lasts approximately 7 minutes.

The Right Kind of Boasting

In this episode of “Exegetically Speaking” . . .

Dr. Josh Moody, Senior Pastor at College Church (Wheaton, IL), considers what we should and should not boast in according to the book of Romans. Josh Moody

You can copy and paste the following URL to your browser:

https://exegeticallyspeaking.libsyn.com/from-text-to-sermon-0

or click here.

This podcasts last approximately 7 minutes.

Men of Valor

In this episode of “Exegetically Speaking” . . .

Dr. Aubrey Buster, Assistant Professor in Old Testament, ponders how a Hebrew expression can have different meanings in different books and contexts. She uses an example where “man of valor” can describe the notorious Jephthah in Judges and also the upright Boaz in the book of Ruth.Unknown-3

You can copy and paste the following URL into your browser:

https://exegeticallyspeaking.libsyn.com/men-of-calor

or click here.

The podcast lasts approximately seven minutes.

Why Literal Translations Aren’t Always the Best

In this edition of “Exegetically Speaking” . . .

Dr. Douglas Moo, Kenneth T. Wessner Professor of New Testament at Wheaton College, challenges the assumption that literal, word-for-word translations are always the best. Drawing upon his experience on the NIV translation committee, he illustrates his concern in Luke 22:31-32, showing the value of translating for sense rather than word-for-word.wheaton-magazine_august-2017-103036-200x225

You can copy and paste the following URL in your browser:

https://exegeticallyspeaking.libsyn.com/why-literal-translations-arent-the-best

or click here.

The podcast lasts approximately 7 minutes.

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