Disciples in a Tizzy and Present Tense Verbs with Cory Marsh

Dr. Cory Marsh, Professor of New Testament at Southern California Seminary, is passionate about restoring the “pastor-scholar” role in the church, and as such, also serves as Scholar in Residence at Revolve Bible Church in San Juan Capistrano, CA. He is a frequent conference speaker and has written A Primer for Biblical Literacy. In this conversation with David Capes, Cory explains how John’s Greek grammar draws us into the drama experienced by Jesus’ disciples as he jars them with the news of his departure.

To hear the podcast click here.

Spirituality according to John with Rodney Reeves

Rodney Reeves

Rodney Reeves joins David Capes to talk about Spirituality according to John on the Stone Chapel.  He is senior pastor of First Baptist Church in Jonesboro, Arkansas.  He’s been a pastor but also an academic.  He has taught New Testament at Northern Seminary, Southwest Baptist University, and Williams Baptist University. 

Dr. Reeves and Dr. Capes discuss the differing approaches taken by both John and Paul when it comes to spirituality. 

Dr. Reeves defines spirituality in a Biblical sense, and then discusses the effects it has on varying topics in the Gospels, letters and Revelation. He then takes their differences in literary, philosophical, and theological choices. He gestures towards the devotional applications, ultimately giving rise to a modern calling for Christians to “come and see.”

To hear the podcast (20 minutes) click here.

Rodney Reeves publications include:

Rediscovering Jesus: An Introduction to Biblical, Religious and Cultural Perspectives on Christ

Rediscovering Paul: An Introduction to His World, Letters, and Theology

Spirituality According to John: Abiding in Christ in the Johannine Writings

Spirituality According to Paul: Imitating the Apostle of Christ

You may also be interest in another podcast: Episode 85 The Gospels as Stories with Jeannine Brown. https://www.laniertheologicallibrary.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/03/Episode-85-Gospels-as-Stories-with-Jeannine-Brown.mp3

Only Begotten (John 3:16), George Kalantzis

George Kalantzis, Wheaton College

Dr. George Kalantzis is Professor of Theology and Director of The Wheaton Center for Early Christian Studies at Wheaton College. Among his many publications are Theodore of Mopsuestia: Gospel of John (Australian Catholic University, 2004) and Caesar and the Lamb (Cascade, 2012). Having grown up in Greece, he recalls learning classical and Koiné Greek from within modern Greek, before going on to discuss the meaning and significance of the word the KJV translated as “only begotten.” Philology and theology vindicate the traditional translation.

To hear the podcast (16 minutes) click here.

“Exegetically Speaking” is a weekly podcast of the friends and faculty of Wheaton College, IL and The Lanier Theological Library. Hosted by Dr. David Capes, it features language experts who discuss the importance of learning the biblical languages—Hebrew, Aramaic, and Greek—and show how reading the Bible in the original languages “pays off.” Each podcast lasts between seven and eleven minutes and covers a different topic for those who want to read the Bible for all it is worth.

If you’re interested in going deeper, learn more about Wheaton’s undergraduate degree in Classical Languages (Greek, Hebrew, and Latin) and our MA in Biblical Exegesis

You can hear Exegetically Speaking on SpotifyStitcherApple Podcasts, and YouTube. If you have questions or comments, please contact us at exegetically.speaking@wheaton.edu. And keep listening. 

Sorting out Ambiguities: Greek to English

Dr. Karen Jobes, Professor Emerita, Wheaton College

Dr. Karen Jobes is Gerald F. Hawthorne Professor of New Testament Greek and Exegesis, Emerita, at Wheaton College. She has authored many books and articles, including Invitation to the Septuagint and commentaries on Esther, 1 Peter, and 1, 2, 3 John. She served for years on the Committee for Bible Translation (responsible for the NIV translation of the Bible). She talks about her own introduction to Greek and notes passages where our English translations raise ambiguities that are clarified by knowledge of the Greek.

To hear the podcast (8 minutes) click here.

“Exegetically Speaking” is a weekly podcast of the friends and faculty of Wheaton College, IL and The Lanier Theological Library. Hosted by Dr. David Capes, it features language experts who discuss the importance of learning the biblical languages—Hebrew, Aramaic, and Greek—and show how reading the Bible in the original languages “pays off.” Each podcast lasts between seven and eleven minutes and covers a different topic for those who want to read the Bible for all it is worth.

If you’re interested in going deeper, learn more about Wheaton’s undergraduate degree in Classical Languages (Greek, Hebrew, and Latin) and our MA in Biblical Exegesis

You can hear Exegetically Speaking on SpotifyStitcherApple Podcasts, and YouTube. If you have questions or comments, please contact us at exegetically.speaking@wheaton.edu.

Figural Reading . . . the Old in the New

Last year I had the great honor of being on a panel discussion at the Lanier Theological Library with some leading scholars.  The topic was “Figural Reading . . . the Old in the New.” Richard Hays had written an important book on the topic entitled, Reading Backwards: Figural Christology and the Fourfold Gospel Witness (Baylor University Press, 2014). That was the topic of our discussion.  It is an outstanding conversation hosted by Mark Lanier.

Richard Hays (Dean, Duke Divinity School)
Lynn Cohick (Professor, Wheaton College)
Carey Newman (Director, Baylor University Press)
David Capes (Professor, Houston Baptist University)
Mark Lanier (Moderator)

Here is a link to the site:

http://www.laniertheologicallibrary.org/seminar-videos-2/

The discussion takes place over 1 hr and 43 minutes.  If you’re interested in how NT writers read, interpreted and used their Bible–what we call the Old Testament but specifically the Greek version of the Old Testament–this will be a good video to watch.

I’m humbled and gratified to be a part of these conversations.