The Grandmothers of Jesus with Amy Peeler

Dr. Amy Peeler is Associate Professor of New Testament at Wheaton College and Graduate School. Her research has concentrated in the Letter to the Hebrews, Paul and Gender, and the Gospel of Mark. She has contributed previous episodes to this podcast, and among her publications is Hebrews: An Introduction and Study Guide. Today’s topic: The presence and the selection of the women in Matthew’s opening genealogy is a call to reflection. How do their stories contribute to the story of Jesus and the world he came to save from its sins?

To hear the podcast (8 minutes) click here.

“Exegetically Speaking” is a weekly podcast of the friends and faculty of Wheaton College, IL and The Lanier Theological Library. Hosted by Dr. David Capes, it features language experts who discuss the importance of learning the biblical languages—Hebrew, Aramaic, and Greek—and show how reading the Bible in the original languages “pays off.” Each podcast lasts between seven and eleven minutes and covers a different topic for those who want to read the Bible for all it is worth.

If you’re interested in going deeper, learn more about Wheaton’s undergraduate degree in Classical Languages (Greek, Hebrew, and Latin) and our MA in Biblical Exegesis

You can hear Exegetically Speaking on SpotifyStitcherApple Podcasts, and YouTube. If you have questions or comments, please contact us at exegetically.speaking@wheaton.edu. And keep listening. Jesus

“Electric Jesus” with Chris White

To hear the podcast, click here.

“Electric Jesus” is a movie directed by Chris White, a filmmaker (screenwriter and director) who makes his home in sunny South Carolina. 

It is a funny, moving adventure, a nostalgic look at the place of contemporary Christian music in the 1980s (released Nov 2021). 

WHO IS CHRIS WHITE?

Chris is a Gen-Xer who earned a degree in theater from Furman University.  He has been creating stories and telling stories his entire life.

He is married to Emily, and they have three children who are in their 20s.  Chris and Emily work together to develop film projects, mostly in the genre of narrative feature. 

Art has a way of speaking into our lives.  It can communicate truth and worldview in unique ways.  Filmmakers are some of the story tellers of our time. 

Chris and Emily do not always make faith-based films, but their faith makes it into their films. 

The Movie Electric Jesus

“Electric Jesus” is a coming-of-age rock ‘n’ roll story of a Christian band known as “3:16” (after John 3:16).  The young men in the band are not sinister, stupid, or superheroes.  They are talented teenagers, goofy and weird, rough around the edges. Here’s more about the movie.

https://linktr.ee/electricjesus

Jesus Music

“Jesus music,” as it was known in the early days, was centralized in southern California.  Converted hippies had their guitars and drums. esusMusic was a natural outgrowth of that movement.  Often the music they created was edgy, but the gospel reshaped the lyrical content of their songs.  By the 1980s contemporary Christian music had become an industry in itself. 

Interestingly, rock ‘n’ roll is an outgrowth of blues, gospel, and jazz.  Sister Rosetta Tharpe, an African American guitarist and performer, was one of its pioneers.

Chris and Emily are on to their next project, a film about making peace with your past.  Something we all need to do. 

We’re grateful to Chris for stopping by to talk about his art and his films.  We look forward to seeing what they come up with next.

Look for “Electric Jesus” on a variety of streaming services.  And share it with a friend. 

More about Chris

Stick around for a nugget of wisdom from Chris at the end of the podcast. 

Read about Chris and Electric Jesus on IMDb here.

Follow him on Twitter here.

For more Stone Chapel Podcasts, click here.

Is the Kingdom Advancing Forcefully or Suffering Violence?

To hear the podcast (9 minutes) click here.

Bradley Trout is a Ph.D. student at North-West University, Potchefstroom, South Africa, and he teaches Greek and Hebrew at George Whitefield College, Cape Town, South Africa. His current research is on the law in Matthew’s gospel within the Greco-Roman milieu. Today’s topic: A key verb in Matt. 11:12 could be taken as passive or middle voice leading to opposing translations, negative and positive. Jesus may be declaring that the kingdom of God is being subjected to violence or that it is forcefully advancing. There are contextual reasons to favor the passive, negative sense.

“Exegetically Speaking” is a weekly podcast of the friends and faculty of Wheaton College, IL and The Lanier Theological Library. Hosted by Dr. David Capes, it features language experts who discuss the importance of learning the biblical languages—Hebrew, Aramaic, and Greek—and show how reading the Bible in the original languages “pays off.” Each podcast lasts between seven and eleven minutes and covers a different topic for those who want to read the Bible for all it is worth.

If you’re interested in going deeper, learn more about Wheaton’s undergraduate degree in Classical Languages (Greek, Hebrew, and Latin) and our MA in Biblical Exegesis

You can hear Exegetically Speaking on SpotifyStitcherApple Podcasts, and YouTube. If you have questions or comments, please contact us at exegetically.speaking@wheaton.edu. And keep listening. 

Disciples in a Tizzy and Present Tense Verbs with Cory Marsh

Dr. Cory Marsh, Professor of New Testament at Southern California Seminary, is passionate about restoring the “pastor-scholar” role in the church, and as such, also serves as Scholar in Residence at Revolve Bible Church in San Juan Capistrano, CA. He is a frequent conference speaker and has written A Primer for Biblical Literacy. In this conversation with David Capes, Cory explains how John’s Greek grammar draws us into the drama experienced by Jesus’ disciples as he jars them with the news of his departure.

To hear the podcast click here.

The Early High Christology Club with Carey Newman

The Stone Chapel Podcast

The Early High Christology Club (EHCC) was a loose association of scholars from various backgrounds and different religious traditions.

They all  became convinced that the early circles of the Jesus movement regarded their Lord as having “high” or divine status. 

Carey Newman, executive editor at Fortress Press, joins David Capes on “The Stone Chapel Podcast” to talk about the beginning and contribution of the “club” to modern scholarship. 

Both Capes and Newman were founding members of the club, and unfortunately, they are the only surviving  members. 

Over the roughly 25 years the club “met,” it boasted some of the most significant voices in New Testament Studies: Larry Hurtado, Alan Segal, Paula Fredriksen, Donald Juel, April DeConick, Martin Hengel, Pheme Perkins, N. T. Wright, Marianne Meye Thompson, Richard Hays and a host of others. 

As an informal club, it had no membership.  But scholars who heard of the group wanted to become members and own one of the coveted coffee mugs produced by Baylor University Press. 

To be a member, a scholar needed to have written books or articles making the case that the evidence demonstrates that Jesus is worshiped from early moments of the movement and set in such close association with God that he could properly be referred to as divine. 

After relating the “founding myth” of the organization in the mid-1990s Carey Newman situates the club within the stream of scholarship. 

Some regard the worship of Jesus to be a later development in the first century (60-70 years after the execution of Jesus).  Others think it happened much later (hundreds of years).  But members of the EHCC generally make the case that historically it arose for various reasons within the first decade of the movement. 

Several Early High Christology Club members have lectured at the Lanier Library: Larry Hurtado, Richard Hays, Mike Bird, and N. T. Wright.  Among the special collections, the library has the libraries of two of the founding members: Alan Segal and Larry Hurtado.  It also houses many of the books of Peter Davids and David Capes, two key members.

The late Larry Hurtado’s blog is a good source of information about the club as well as all things New Testament:  https://larryhurtado.wordpress.com

The title of the book neither David or Carey could remember was Israel’s God and Rebecca’s Children: Christology and Community in Early Judaism and Christianity (Baylor University Press, 2007).

To hear the podcast click here.