A Word in Edgewise

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Trying to Sing the Oldest Song

Dr. Michelle Knight, Assistant Professor of Old Testament and Semitic Languages at Trinity Evangelical Divinity School, considers how knowledge of Semitic languages can help in understanding one of the Bible’s most ancient poems—Deborah’s song in Judges 5. Michelle Knight

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Digging Deeper with Words

Sometimes an English Bible translation is unable to convey repetition and wordplay at work in the original languages. In this podcast, Dr. Daniel Carroll Rodas, Blanchard Professor of Old Testament at Wheaton College Graduate School, offers insight into how word repetition and wordplay function in Biblical Hebrew.  Danny Carroll

 

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How Language Works

My colleague, Dr. Danny Carroll Rodas, Blanchard Professor of Old Testament at Wheaton College Graduate School, draws upon his bi-lingual upbringing (Spanish and English) to reflect upon how language works in a given culture. When it comes to biblical Hebrew, Dr. Carroll Rodas highlights three structures within Hebrew discourse: chiasm, emphasis, and acrostics. Danny Carroll

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John Williams, Star Wars, and the March of Kingship

Dr. Adam Miglio, Associate Professor of Archaeology at Wheaton College, discusses the way Hebrew words are repeated in order to provide a “bread crumb trail” to focus our attention on key themes we might miss in translation.  It’s not unlike the musical score of “Star Wars.” Adam Miglio wheaton.jpg

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Ten Reasons Why the Original Languages Are Important in Exegetical Work

Veteran interpreter, Dr. John Walton, goes briefly through ten reasons why knowing and working in the original, biblical languages–Greek, Hebrew, and Aramaic–are important if you want to get at the meaning behind the Scriptures. john walton

http://exegeticallyspeaking.libsyn.com/10-reasons-the-original-languages-are-important-exegetical-work

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