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How the Spirit Became God

Dr. Kyle Hughes

Kyle Hughes has written an important book, and he joins David Capes on “The Stone Chapel” to discuss it.  The book is How the Spirit Became God: The Mosaic of Early Christian Pneumatology (Cascade Books, 2020).  In this book Hughes tells a compelling story of how the church came to recognize the Spirit as divine and as a “person.”  With a firm grasp on relevant primary and second literature he makes the case for an early and consistent divine pneumatology arising out of how Christians over several centuries read their Scriptures, the Old and New Testaments.

To hear the podcast (22 minutes) click here.

The Stone Chapel is a podcast of the friends and staff of the Lanier Theological Library in Houston, Texas.  It is hosted by Dr. David Capes, Senior Research Fellow at the library and former faculty member at Houston Baptist University and Wheaton College.  The purpose of the podcast is to bring to our audience great conversations from the world’s leading experts in theology, biblical studies, archaeology, Church history, the Dead Sea Scrolls, ethics, ministry, and a host of other topics close to the mission of the library.

The Lanier Theological Library is a magnet for scholars, church leaders and influencers.  For the last ten years, it has welcomed hundreds of academics and church leaders from across the globe for public lectures, study, panel discussions, consultations, and encouragement.

These podcasts as well as the Lanier library and the Stone Chapel are generously underwritten by Mark and Becky Lanier and the Lanier Theological Library Foundation.  If you have questions or comments, please be in touch: Email david.capes@lanierlibrary.org

The Beautiful Ache

Leigh McLeroy

Leigh McLeroy (MA in Cultural Apologetics, Houston Baptist University), writer, speaker, ghostwriter, dog-lover, stops by to talk with David Capes on “The Stone Chapel” about her amazing book, The Beautiful Ache: Finding the God Who Satisfies When Life Does Not.  Leigh is a wonderful writer who weaves together stories from life and Scripture to talk about all of our spiritual journeys.  This book is for anyone whose longings do not match the reality of this world.  This is “the ache” we all experience, but is a sure sign that there is something more.

To hear the podcast click here.

The Stone Chapel is a podcast of the friends and staff of the Lanier Theological Library in Houston, Texas.  It is hosted by Dr. David Capes, Senior Research Fellow at the library and former faculty member at Houston Baptist University and Wheaton College.  The purpose of the podcast is to bring to our audience great conversations from the world’s leading experts in theology, biblical studies, archaeology, Church history, the Dead Sea Scrolls, ethics, ministry, and a host of other topics close to the mission of the library.

The Lanier Theological Library is a magnet for scholars, church leaders and influencers.  For the last ten years, it has welcomed hundreds of academics and church leaders from across the globe for public lectures, study, panel discussions, consultations, and encouragement.

These podcasts as well as the Lanier library and the Stone Chapel are generously underwritten by Mark and Becky Lanier and the Lanier Theological Library Foundation.  If you have questions or comments, please be in touch: Email david.capes@lanierlibrary.org

God’s Messiah in the Old Testament

Andy Abernethy, Wheaton College

Andrew Abernethy, PhD Trinity Evangelical Divinity School, is a former colleague of David Capes at Wheaton College.  He is an Associate Professor of Old Testament at Wheaton College and Degree Coordinator for the Master of Arts in Biblical Exegesis.  He is author of many articles, but the focus of this podcast is a book he wrote along with Dr. Gregory Goswell of Christ College in Sydney, Australia.  It is entitled God’s Messiah in the Old Testament: Expectations of a Coming King (Baker Academic, 2020).  While some scholars find precious little “messianism” in the Old Testament, others find it in nearly every verse.  So, what is the truth?  Abernethy and Goswell take a book by book approach to work through those passages that look forward to a coming messianic king.

To listen to the podcast click here.

The Stone Chapel is a podcast of the friends and staff of the Lanier Theological Library in Houston, Texas.  It is hosted by Dr. David Capes, Senior Research Fellow at the library and former faculty member at Houston Baptist University and Wheaton College.  The purpose of the podcast is to bring to our audience great conversations from the world’s leading experts in theology, biblical studies, archaeology, Church history, the Dead Sea Scrolls, ethics, ministry, and a host of other topics close to the mission of the library.

The Lanier Theological Library is a magnet for scholars, church leaders and influencers.  For the last ten years, it has welcomed hundreds of academics and church leaders from across the globe for public lectures, study, panel discussions, consultations, and encouragement.

These podcasts as well as the Lanier library and the Stone Chapel are generously underwritten by Mark and Becky Lanier and the Lanier Theological Library Foundation.  If you have questions or comments, please be in touch: Email david.capes@lanierlibrary.org

God-talk in the New Testament

Here is a link to a good post by my friend, Larry Hurtado.  It is his reflection on over 30 years of critiques of his work.  Critics have accused his work of being either Arian or proto-Calcedonian.  Both accusations are drawn from later church controversies and should not be read back into the New Testament.  If Hurtado can be accused of anything, it is doing history not theology.  He’s not averse to theology; he just thinks the later categories invade historical reconstructions too often.

Read more about it here.

Or you can cut-and-paste this URL: https://larryhurtado.wordpress.com/2016/07/19/jesus-and-god/

God in NT Theology

How God Became Jesus

How God Became Jesus

I’m heading to San Diego to attend the Annual Society of Biblical Literature meeting.  I’m meeting with former and future publishers, scholars, and a variety of former students.  One of my duties while there is to preside over a session of a program unit called The Extent of Theological Diversity in Earliest Christianity.  The session will offer a panel review of Bart Ehrman’s new book, How Jesus Became God: The Exaltation of a Jewish Preacher from Galilee.  The title and subtitle tells you the essential story; Ehrman suggests that Jesus was understood first as Jewish itinerant teacher from Galilee; only later did his disciples claim he is divine.  How much time goes by he does not say, but apparently he thinks in some circles it happened early even though it took centuries for the language to be worked out in church councils.  Accordingly, Jesus didn’t regard  himself as divine in any sense, nor did his earliest disciples.  Jesus was, in fact, an apocalyptic prophet who announced the end of the current evil age.  He did believe and describe himself as the coming king of God’s future reign, the Messiah of God. Once the disciples came to believe that Jesus had conquered death and was exalted to God’s right hand, they came to hold to his divinity.  It is an important new book, some say his most significant book to date.How Jesus Became God

The book is published by HarperOne, an imprint of Harper Collins.  Interestingly, when Bart’s book was being prepared, someone got the idea to commission a group of other scholars to respond to the book. This happened  at Zondervan, which is now part of the Christian Publishing Group of . . . yep, Harper Collins.  Nice stroke.  Both ways, they win.  “Heads, I win. Tails, you lose.”  So editors at Zondervan appointed Michael F. Bird  of Ridley College in Melbourne, Australia to edit the book, and he assembled an impressive group of internationally recognized scholars to answer various aspects  of Bart’s book.  Their book is entitled How God Became Jesus The Real Origins of Belief in Jesus’ Divine Nature.  On the cover it also says it is “a response to Bart D. Ehrman.”  The scholars Bird assembled include: Craig Evans, Simon Gathercole, Charles Hill, Chris Tilling.  Each scholar takes on a different challenge.  For example, Craig Evans addresses the question of burial practices at the time of Jesus.  Ehrman claims Jesus was not buried; instead, in keeping with what happened with other crucified persons, Jesus’ corpse became food for scavengers. If there was no burial, there could be no empty tomb, so those traditions must have been invented by early Christians convinced Jesus  somehow conquered death.  Professor  Evans presents evidence that crucified people were occasionally buried and makes the further claim that Jesus must have been one of them.  This is the way it goes.  Point.  Counterpoint.How God Become Jesus

Both books make an important contribution to the study of early Christianity, in particular how early  Jesus’ followers came to regard him as divine.  In the history of the west and of the Christian church this may well be one of its most significant chapters.

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