Sam I am and Divine Christology

I had a great conversation recently with “Sam I am” on his podcast and video cast. It had to do with my book The Divine Christ: Paul, the Lord Jesus, and the Scriptures of Israel (Baker Academic, 2018), and other things. The book has been out a couple of years and is gaining ground. Sam did a wonderful job shepherding the show; and while we might find some areas over which we disagree, he was not disagreeable. If you are interested in Christology, please pass this along!

To hear and see the conversation on YouTube click here.

Or you can try here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EznUeCZ4Qcg

Son-of-God-in-power, Romans 1:3-4 with Matthew Bates

Dr. Matthew Bates, Quincy University

Dr. Matthew Bates is Associate Professor of Theology at Quincy University. He recalls how, having majored in physics as an undergraduate, he learned beginning Greek independently before jumping into second-year Greek in seminary. Among his several publications are The Birth of the Trinity (Oxford, 2015) and Salvation by Allegiance Alone(Baker, 2017). In this episode he reveals how Paul’s choice of verbiage in an important summary of the gospel indicates his conceptions of Christ’s nature and history, especially both his divine pre-existence and his exaltation.

To listen to the podcast click here.

“Exegetically Speaking” is a weekly podcast of the friends and faculty of Wheaton College, IL and The Lanier Theological Library. Hosted by Dr. David Capes, it features language experts who discuss the importance of learning the biblical languages—Hebrew, Aramaic, and Greek—and show how reading the Bible in the original languages “pays off.” Each podcast lasts between seven and eleven minutes and covers a different topic for those who want to read the Bible for all it is worth.

If you’re interested in going deeper, learn more about Wheaton’s undergraduate degree in Classical Languages (Greek, Hebrew, and Latin) and our MA in Biblical Exegesis

You can hear Exegetically Speaking on SpotifyStitcherApple Podcasts, and YouTube. If you have questions or comments, please contact us at exegetically.speaking@wheaton.edu. And keep listening. 

Messianic Theology of the New Testament

Dr. Joshua Jipp, associate professor of New Testament at Trinity Evangelical Divinity School, joins David Capes this week on The Stone Chapel podcast. He has written an important book entitled The Messianic Theology of the New Testament (Eerdmans, 2020).  His particular focus is to survey and understand the royal messianism associated with the Davidic dynasty.  He makes the point that there is no standardized, pre-existing view of the messiah at the time of Jesus; instead, there has been a robust “messianic discourse” that has been going on for hundreds of years centered on King David and his legacy.

To hear the podcast on Apple podcasts click here.

The Stone Chapel is a podcast of the friends and staff of the Lanier Theological Library in Houston, Texas.  It is hosted by Dr. David Capes, Senior Research Fellow at the library and former faculty member at Houston Baptist University and Wheaton College.  The purpose of the podcast is to bring to our audience great conversations from the world’s leading experts in theology, biblical studies, archaeology, Church history, the Dead Sea Scrolls, ethics, ministry, and a host of other topics close to the mission of the library.

The Lanier Theological Library is a magnet for scholars, church leaders and influencers.  For the last ten years, it has welcomed hundreds of academics and church leaders from across the globe for public lectures, study, panel discussions, consultations, and encouragement.

These podcasts as well as the Lanier library and the Stone Chapel are generously underwritten by Mark and Becky Lanier and the Lanier Theological Library Foundation.  If you have questions or comments, please be in touch: Email david.capes@lanierlibrary.org

Author and Perfecter of Faith

Dr. Amy Peeler, Associate Professor of New Testament, joins Dr. Capes on Exegetically Speaking to talk about an important Christological statement in Hebrews 12:1-2.  What does it mean that Jesus is “the author and perfector of the faith”? How does that statement pull together a variety of motifs earlier in the letter?

You can find it on your favorite podcast platform or cut and paste this URL to your browser

http://exegeticallyspeaking.libsyn.com/the-author-and-perfecter-of-the-faith

or click here

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One God, One Lord (Part 10)

Two of the major influences on Larry Hurtado’s work were a book and a friendship.  The book was Alan Segal’s classic Two Powers in Heaven: Early Rabbinic Reports about Christianity and Gnosticism (SJLA, 25; Leiden: E. J. Brill, 1977).  The book has been re-published twice to my knowledge, most recently by Baylor University Press (2012).  Segal examined the rabbinic sources about early manifestations of what is called the “two powers” heresy in Judaism.  Certain rabbis condemned these “heretics” (minim) who appear to be reverencing two deities, therefore violating one of the basic tenets of Jewish monotheism.  Segal’s work is useful for understanding the complex interactions among Jews, Christians and Gnostics in the centuries that followed Jesus’ execution.  Some of the Jewish heretics condemned may have been Jewish Christians.  But as Hurtado noted, something more than beliefs about Jesus are being challenged; likely it had to do with the Jewish Christian propensity of reverencing Jesus in ways later rabbis deemed blasphemous. 9781602585492

The other influence was the friendship that struck up between Alan and Larry over the next few years.  Alan endorsed the first edition of One God, One Lord (1988) and the second (1998).  Alan and Larry came from two different worlds, but they became fast and good friends.  Alan was a Jewish New Testament scholar from the Northeast.  Larry was a Christian New Testament scholar from the Midwest, who loved Canada and his adopted home in the UK.  They had much in common and much in difference, but the differences were made sweeter over time as they spent time together at professional meetings and in Larry’s and Shannon’s Edinburgh home.

Both Alan and Larry were founding members of the Early High Christology Club (along with Carey Newman and David Capes).  In a future post, I’ll share the founding myth of the club.

In 2007 colleagues conspired to produce a Festchrift in honor of them both (Israel’s God and Rebecca’s Children: Christology and Community in Early Judaism and Christianity, Essays in Honor of Larry W. Hurtado and Alan F. Segal, eds. David B. Capes, April D. DeConick, Helen K. Bond and Troy A. Miller [Waco, TX: Baylor University, 2007]). Each were told they were writing an essay for the other in the others’ Festschrift.  They didn’t know it was a joint Festschrift until the reveal in San Diego in 2007. When they realized what was happening, it was a great moment.

When Alan became “unwell” a few years later, we were all glad we had not waited a few years before we honored them with this volume.  Carey, Larry and I flew to New York a few weeks before Alan died to visit him in the hospital near his home.  As with all good friends, his death left a hole in our lives.  We miss Alan, his quirky sense of humor and ability to order food in 21 languages, and now we miss his friend.